It’s a Hectic Life: Time Management For the Holidays and Beyond

Holiday Clock It’s extremely normal to feel pressed for time throughout the calendar year, but the holiday season can exacerbate the dreadful feeling of not being able to get everything (or anything) done, whether it needs to get done at work, at home, or in the community.

So much has been written on the topic that it can be a time management feat in itself to find the best time management book for you. Here are a variety of resources from the library that generally earn soild reviews from readers and users. Different approaches may work for different people.


Eat That Frog!: 21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done in Less Time by Brian Tracy
Eat That Frog! Book Cover
 

Considered by many to be a modern productivity classic, the title is inspired by an old saying, "Eat a live frog first thing in the morning and nothing worse will happen to you the rest of the day." "Eat that frog" becomes a metaphor for getting the most unpleasant task of the day out of the way first. The author puts forth 21 steps to help the reader conquer procrastination and accomplish the important things. This title is also available from the library in e-book format.



​​​​​Pomodoro Technique Illustrated: The Easy Way to Do More in Less Time by Staffan Nöteberg
Pomodoro Technique Illustrated Book Cover

Pomodoro” refers to the author’s tomato-shaped timer. The technique was first developed by Francisco Cirillo in the late 1980s. The basic idea is to set an egg timer for 25 minutes at a time to focus on a task, which breaks it into intervals and incorporates frequent breaks. Author Nöteberg's book explores how to apply this technique amid the distractions of the Internet age.


Time Management from the Inside Out: The Foolproof Method for Taking Control of Your Schedule – And Your Life
by Julie Morgenstern
Time Management from the Inside Out Book Cover


Julie Morgenstern's philosophy is: "Every system should be designed from the inside out, based on your unique goals, natural habits and style, so that your system lasts." The book's premise is that time management is a learnable skill anyone can master, and lays out the details of a three-point plan: analyze, strategize, and attack. This title is also available from the library in audio e-book format via Hoopla.


The Productivity Project: Accomplishing More by Managing Your Time, Attention, and Energy Better by Chris Bailey
The Productivity Project Book Cover


After obtaining his business degree, the author spent a year of his life trying and evaluating different approaches to productivity, including sleeping less, cutting out caffeine and sugar, limiting smartphone use to an hour a day, and more. Read the book to find out what did and didn't work for him.




Lynda.com
Lynda.com
Time management courses are also available from Lynda.com. San Jose Library card holders can access them for free via the library’s Web site. Lynda.com’s time management course instructors include Dave Crenshaw, author of The Myth of Multitasking, and David Allen, author of Getting Things Done.

Comments

Hi Sarah, I'm more than happy to inform you that this article is featured in our latest episode of weekly Productivity Articles roundup! Thank you so much for sharing great content and your productivity ideas. Please find the entire list here: https://www.timecamp.com/blog/index.php/2016/12/productivity-articles-41116/ Ola Rybacka, Social Media Manager at TimeCamp

That's awesome! Glad you were able to use it and thanks for letting me know!

Thank you for being a light to us. I have lived other places and the libraries have never given us information that you sent out. I really appreciate it. And it has allowed me to keep my parents that I work with involved in the community by going to the library. Thank you

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