2018 Literary Anniversaries

Celebrate some classics by re-reading them during their milestone anniversary year!

Frankenstein

200th Anniversary: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Shelley’s novel was first published in January 1818. It was the result of a legendary ghost story-writing competition between Shelley, her husband Percy Bryce Shelley, and their poet friends Lord Byron and John Polidori. They entertained each other at a vacation home on Lake Geneva when the weather turned rotten. Some consider Frankenstein to be the very first science fiction novel.


Little Women

150th Anniversary: Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

1868’s Little Women is one of the most seminal works of American children’s literature. When the following century saw the birth of film and television, it also saw a number of screen adaptations of the beloved story.


T.S. Eliot: The Complete Poems and Players 1909 - 1950

75th Anniversary: Four Quartets by T.S. Eliot

T.S. Eliot’s famous meditative poems were written over a six-year period, but were first published as a complete quartet in 1943.


Book Cover: A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula LeGuin

50th Anniversary: A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula K. LeGuin

1968’s A Wizard of Earthsea is probably the most famous novel by the prolific American author. The young adult coming-of-age fantasy has influenced many contemporary writers such as Neil Gaiman and Iain Banks.


Book Cover: Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh

25th Anniversary: Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh

Welsh’s book about Scottish addicts has achieved cult status since it was first published in 1993. The 1996 film adaptation helped make it a pop culture phenomenon.

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